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Ruach Black Tolex Size 2.5 Pedalboard

Black tolex…a staple across live and studio equipment for decades so its only right that we’ve decided to wrap up some boards with it.  Tailored to be understated and charming; your pedalboard will remain a powerful feature of your set up while retaining a level of elegance that will be appreciated by your audience.

Sized at 46x32x8cm, the size 2.5 pedal board has so much spec packed into it’s modest housing, holding 8 Boss Effects Pedals comfortably – its the middle child of our Size 2 and 3 boards. This board offers the ability to install up to 6 Ruach Solderless Locking Jacks via the predrilled outlets on each side of board –  allowing you to simply plug in an input and an output and play, with absolute peace of mind that no leads are going to come loose mid solo!

Ruach Orange Tolex Size 2.5 Pedalboard

The warm colour of our Orange Tolex Pedalboards is both eye-catching and classy. If you can look at this pedalboard and not feel compelled to melt faces with some driving power chords then you deserve a medal.

Sized at 46x32x8cm, the size 2.5 pedal board has so much spec packed into it’s modest housing, holding 8 Boss Effects Pedals comfortably – its the middle child of our Size 2 and 3 boards. This board offers the ability to install up to 6 Ruach Solderless Locking Jacks via the predrilled outlets on each side of board –  allowing you to simply plug in an input and an output and play, with absolute peace of mind that no leads are going to come loose mid solo!

Ruach Light Tweed Size 2.5 Pedalboard

Let us transport you to a smokey, dimly lit Chicago blues joint with our new classic light tweed pedalboard. Stare long enough at the tweed pattern and you can almost hear a I, IV, V progression.

Sized at 46x32x8cm, the size 2.5 pedal board has so much spec packed into it’s modest housing, holding 8 Boss Effects Pedals comfortably – its the middle child of our Size 2 and 3 boards. This board offers the ability to install up to 6 Ruach Solderless Locking Jacks via the predrilled outlets on each side of board –  allowing you to simply plug in an input and an output and play, with absolute peace of mind that no leads are going to come loose mid solo!

Don’t Get Ripped Off! Buying and Selling Gear Online

As a member of multiple Facebook guitar groups and forums I have started to notice more and more suspected fraudulent activity. Members of these groups have either shared stories of how they have gotten ripped off by sellers selling fake products or they have let go of their cherished instruments only to receive no payment. In each instance of fraud the victim will face many brick walls feeling helpless and cheated. This article aims to make you aware of when you should be cautious buying and selling online and points out some ways to identify genuine instruments from well known brands.

Complete Transactions In Person

A recent letter from one distressed guitarist to The Guardian newspaper explained how fraudsters use EBay’s terms of sale to make things difficult for sellers. The seller in question advertised his Fender Stratocaster and a bid was accepted; after posting the item to the given address the buyer opened multiple cases against him claiming the guitar was “Not as Described” and the “Item was not received”. As the letter states, the seller faced paying out the value of the winning bid plus fees; he was left with no options and the buyer refused to sign missing item forms needed to open a case with the courier. So PayPal ruled in the buyers favour at what seems to have been on trust alone that what he was saying was the truth. EBay closed the case not carrying out a sufficient investigation and the courier could not act without the required documents. An honest musician was left £1,165 out of pocket.

Dear guitarists and internet shoppers, if you wish to buy or sell an instrument through online second hand websites arrange to meet with the other party in person. Make sure you are getting the product as described in the ad, the money you receive is correct and that both individuals are happy.

Spotting A Fake

Another example of fraudulent behaviour is that the item is a fake copy of what it is described as being. The Facebook groups I am associated with are extremely helpful when it comes to fake products. It pays to join groups that are made up of experienced players that are more than happy to give their opinions and advice. It is common to find fakes of two major guitar manufacturers, Fender and Gibson, but there are ways to identify copies that you should be aware of. Two videos posted by Kennis Russell on YouTube highlight some things to help spot a fake Fender and  a fake Gibson. He notes the following:

Fender

The logo on the headstock is a big giveaway if someone has removed a previous logo to add a Fender one. Fake instruments tend to have a waterslide decal where as this is only present on vintage Fenders as newer models are laser printed.

The quality of the hardware is noticeably cheaper on fakes; take a look at the bridge, saddles and the smoothness of the pots. Genuine saddles tend to have the Fender logo engraved.

Looking at the neck of the guitar check how the frets are finished; are they smooth or rough? Does the nut look like a good quality of material or a cheap plastic?

The trust rod access on genuine American Fenders is finished with a wooden insert; Mexicans tend to have a plastic one whereas Squires and fakes will have no insert.

Check the serial number online; this will tell you what the instrument is and when it was made.

Gibson

Gibson instruments are easily identifiable by their headstocks; they are a particular shape and are finished to perfection. If you notice that the shape is a little off, the logo looks a little bold or the placement is off, it is likely a fake

All Gibson Les Pauls have two screws securing the truss road cover; Epiphones may have three.

The binding on the guitar will have no paint spills; check along the guitar neck to see if the paint has made its way onto the binding.

The serial number is engraved into Gibson instruments, not incredibly deep but just enough to be clear. Check this serial number online as Gibson will provide you with the correct authentication.

Kennis’s videos are an extremely helpful visual to get to know some of the ways fake instruments can be identified so we would recommend you take a look. It is however important to note a few things regarding copies. Copies are not necessarily bad guitars; they are just not the real thing. If the seller is genuine and states that the instrument is a copy with a price reflecting this, you could have yourself a great guitar for the money. If you play enough Gibson and Fender guitars, you should become familiar with how they are meant to feel and you will be able to identify a fake.

So be careful when buying and selling a second hand instrument. Try to meet with the person at the other end of the transaction and have a play on the product. When everyone is happy that the instrument and money are real you can complete the transaction safely.

Making Pedalboards Easy!

Setting up your perfect pedalboard takes some planning, time and budgeting but when it’s finished you will have a world of tones at your feet. Here are some things to consider making sure you get the desired results without going over budget!

Choosing The Right Board To Build On

There is a few different types of pedalboards available with unique features that may appeal to you more than others. The first thing to consider is size; if you are only planning on using a small amount of pedals there is no point buying something that is too big for its purpose or if you plan on having a lot of pedals buy a pedalboard that will fit them all.
Some pedalboards feature locking input and output jacks which are great for securing your instrument cables in place so nothing comes loose mid solo! Ruach offers solderless locking jacks on all pedalboards from size 2.5 upwards so all you need to do is plug your instrument or amp in one end  and a patch cable connected to your effects pedals to the other end.

Laying Out Your Pedals

There are no set in stone rules when it comes to laying out the effects on your pedalboard. There is however a template which is generally followed for less hisses, hums and unwanted sounds.

Tuner>>Dynamics>>Pitch>> Gain>> Modulation>> Time>> Volume/ Noise Suppression>> Loop

Tuner: needs the cleanest signal from the guitar to give the most accurate readings.

Dynamics: Includes compressors, wahs and volume control. Having the volume control at the start leaves delay tails unaffected later in the signal path.

Pitch: Again needs a clean signal for the most accurate results.

Gain: Distortions, overdrives, fuzz pedals and any amp in a box style pedal can be classed as gain and having these before delays and reverbs make for a less muddy signal.

Modulation: Chorus, flanger, tremolo and phaser are the most popular modulation pedals but this can also include some of the stranger and lesser used effects like organ or piano simulators.

Time: Giving delays and reverbs access to all other previous pedals will make sure tails and repeats are as clear as possible.

Volume/ Noise Suppression: Although these were mentioned at the start of the signal chain, it may also be desirable to cut off the signal entirely; this is done by adding kill switches at the end of the signal path. It’s still hard to cut out all noises made by pedals and grounding issues but a noise suppressor at the end of the signal chain can clean up nicely.

Loop Pedals: The phrases you record will remain unaffected if you turn on or off pedals that have been placed before. Loop pedals are perfect at the end of the chain to give the truest representation of what you heard as you were playing.

Effects Loops

Some amplifiers have built in effects loops which can be very useful if you use the amps built in drive channel. The amplifier effects loop can be in series or parallel; If it is in series, the entire signal from the amps preamp will be sent through the connected effects; if it is parallel, half the preamp signal will be passed through the effects allowing you to have a wet and dry mix (I.e. the unaffected amp tone and the tone after the pedals will be heard)

Effects Switching Units

Using an effects switcher can be a great way to stop you having to tap dance on your board to turn on and off multiple pedals between songs. Maybe you play guitars with different pickup configurations and have to adjust your pedals or even use different ones; a switcher makes this much easier. There are a few different options for effects pedal switching units but a special shout out goes out to Mooer and Boss. Mooer has a lot to offer in their low cost ‘pedal controller loop 6’ allowing 6 looping options at a fraction of the price of its competition. Boss however has taken the effects pedal market by storm recently with their ‘MS-3’ which doubles up as an impressive multi effects unit! Both options eliminate the need for a tuner pedal as they have great ones built in and you can adjust your tone with minimal effort.

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